Is there any risk to a concrete foundation from adding interior insulation?

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Is there any risk to a concrete foundation from adding interior insulation?

Drew Tozer Jan. 5, 2021Last updated: Jan. 6, 2021

An insulation contractor toured my 100-year old house near Toronto and told me that they wouldn't recommend installing any insulation in the basement because it could cause freeze-thaw damage to the foundation. Their stance was that these old houses like to "breathe" so it's better to avoid any changes because it's lasted this long as-is.

I want to follow the "Why are basements moldy" recommendation of rigid insulation board directly against the concrete and then a framed stud wall with mineral wool batts and drywall with latex paint. I'd like to do something simple (EPS + plywood) on the concrete floor too. The rest of the house is double brick with minimal to no insulation in the walls. 

Is that a safe option or is there something to their "don't fix it if it ain't broke" mindset? 

Thanks,

Drew

Responses (4)

Drew Tozer
Drew Tozer Jan. 6, 2021, 4:24 p.m.

It's concrete with parging. According to the home inspection, "no signifcant deficiencies were observed". It's a 2,000 sqft 3-story house built in 1920. The contractor came into the basement but it was just a quick look - I think the advice is simply based on the age of the house. It's an unfinished basement. 

Is spray foam the only (or best) option to insulate between the floor joists? 

I have an 18-year old high efficiency natural gas furnace. I'd like to replace it with a heat pump for environmental reasons. Is there any data about the up front and operating costs of heat pump vs. gas furnaces? Is a GSHP an economically viable option for such an old, drafty, uninsulated house? 

Thanks,

Drew

Emmanuel Cosgrove
Emmanuel Cosgrove Jan. 7, 2021, 10:17 a.m.

Hi Drew,  We aren’t engineers and certainly can’t make a call for you but if the foundation is in that good shape you may be fine to go ahead with it. it’s for sure worth getting a more experience opinion and based on the actual condition rather than just a blanket statement based on the age of the house. The addition of an exterior skirt insulation may also help, meaning – dig down a foot and lay a 4 foot wide skirt of 2-4 inches of insulation around the house and bury it. That would keep the ground by the foundation wall much warmer.  If you decide to do insulate the joists and keep the basement at a lower temperature I wouldn’t say spray foam is the best choice. It’s certainly not the cheapest. You could just use fiberglass or Rockwool. I’m not suggesting you fully insulate it and treat it as if it were exterior, more that you could keep the temperature lower down there since it’s not well insulated, but at least with some insulation in the joists your floors wouldn’t be uncomfortably cold.  As for heat pumps – Ground source, as in geothermal heatin (read more here), is not a cheap set up. Figure on your heating bills being about half, but it could take you 30-40k in investment to get there, so if you’re house isn’t very big then the payback period is likely a long way off. Also check out this page, it goes into more detail -  Comparing ground source and air source heat pumps.